Remington

From Typewriter Wiki


Remington, also known as Sholes and Glidden, Sperry-Rand Remington and Remington - Torpedo, was the first group of people to produce a widely marketed and mass-produced type-writing machine. The company grew to be one of the largest manufacturers of typewriters ever.

History

As Sholes and Glidden

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As Remington

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Torpedo Merger

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Sperry-Rand Merger

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"Remington Typewriters"

Standards

Name Date Range Description & Rarity -
Remington Standard No. 1/ Sholes & Glidden 1880 - 1886 The Remington Standard No. 1/ Sholes & Glidden Typewriter is recognized as the first commercially successful typewriter. It was prototyped by Christopher Latham Sholes in Milwaukee in the late 1870's, and was presented to Remington Arms Co. for manufactering. At first, it was more of a novelty, but it set the precedent of what a typewriter should look like, and began the long legacy of the QWERTY keyboard. These machines are generally considered very rare, but they are around. -
Remington Standard No. 2, No. 3, & No.4 1880 - 1886 The Remington Standard No. 2 is the improved version of the No. 1. These machines are much less ornate and a bit more refined, featuring a shift key allowing the operator to type in capital and lowercase letters. The Remington Standard No. 3 is a wide carriage model of the No. 2, but was only developed as a prototype and never widely manufactured. The Remington Standard No. 4 is the economy model of the No. 2. It is basically the same machine without any shift keys. -
Remington Standard No. 5 1886 - 1898 The Remington Standard No. 5 is the version of the Remington Standard No. 3 built for the European market. It has a slightly shorter carriage, and a bell located on the front of the typewriter instead of on the back. -
Remington Standard No. 6, No.7, No.8, & No.9 1894 - 1914 The Remington Standards No. 6, 7, & 8 are the most widely available Remington upstrike typewriters available today. The Remington Standard No. 6 is the improved version of the No. 5, the 7 is a version of the 6 with more keys, and the 8 is the wide carriage version of the 7. The No. 9 is a 7 with a decimal tabulator. -
Remington Standard No. 10 1908 - 1923 The Remington Standard No. 10 is the first visible frontstroke Remington typewriter available on the market. They are relatively common. -
Remington Standard No. 11, No. 12, No. 20, No. 30, No. 31, No. 92 1922 - The No. 11 is a 10 with a decimal tabulator, the No. 12 is an improved 10 with covers over the sides, the 20 is the "Remington Special", the 30 is a 12 with a decimal tab, the 31 is a 12 with an extended decimal tab and extra keys, and we don't know what makes the 92 special -
Remington 16 1931 - 1943 The Remington 16 is the successor to the 12 and all it's derivatives. These machines are fairly common. -
Remington 17/KMC 1939 - 1950 The Remington KMC is the 1940's redesign of the Remington Standard. Crinkle paint came into style and was used to full effect, and keyboard set margins (hence the acronym "KMC") were introduced to simplify the setting of margins on the machine. These machines are fairly common. -
Remington Super Riter 1950 - 1965 This is the second major shell redesign of the Remington Standard Typewriter. These machines introduced plastic keys, a new curvy shell style, and a green color theme. These machines are fairly common. -
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Portables

Name Date Range Description -
Remington Portable No. 1 1920 - 1925 The Remington Portable no. 1 is a fascinating and common, yet well-built little machine. Very flat, its typebars fold up to type. Early examples may have no right shift key. -
Remington Portable No. 2 1925 - 1928 The Remington Portable no. 2 is very similar to the No. 1. Distinguishing features from the No. 1 include curved typebar guards, a one-piece return lever, and various color combinations. These machines were often rebranded and carry rarer name variants including "Porto-Rite" and "Butler Bros.". -
Remington Portable No. 3 1928 - 1938 The Portable no. 3 may appear similar to the Nos. 1 and 2, but its typebars do not flip up to a 45-degree angle to write. It also carries a 5-space key, occasionally marked "TAB". Distinguishing features include a lip over the typebars and a smooth top cover, and no left platen knob. The Remington Portable No. 4 is a No. 3 with a true tabulator rather than a 5-space key. -
Remington Portable No. 5 1932 - 194X The No. 5 is very similar to the No. 3 but has a "blockier" appearance--though some came in a streamlined shell. All No. 5s have touch control and left platen knobs. -
Remington Noiseless Portable Example Example Example
Remington Rem-Ette Example Remington's most common Depression machine. Works much like a No. 3, but comes in crinkle grey paint and lacks a bell, tab, and other minor functions. Example
Remington - Depression Machines Example Bearing such names like "Pioneer", "Scout", and "Cadet", Remington spawned a variety of depression machines that lacked various features from keys to even a front frame. Of note is the Remington 3B, a glossy, bulbous machine that has 3 1/2 rows of keys of which 5076 were built. Example
Remington Noiseless 7 Example Example Example
Remington All-New Portable Example Example Example
Remington Quiet-Riter Example Example Example
Remington Torpedo machines Example After Remington bought Torpedo in the midst of the Great Depression, it retained control of the company. Remington - Torpedo machines include the Travel-Riter and Torpedo 18S, and are generally mid-to-high quality portables. Example
Remington Sperry - Rand Portables HONESTLY IDK Example Example

For more detailed or obscure models, please refer to https://site.xavier.edu/polt/typewriters/rem-portables.htm by the good Professor Polt, or join the Discord and we can help you 1 on 1.

Notes

WIP